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PUZZLE PRINTS

Level: Primary, Junior, Middle School
Grades: K-8 | Age: 5-14yrs | Written by: Andrea Mulder-Slater
[Andrea is one of the creators of KinderArt.com]
Summary:

Use old puzzle pieces to create fun prints.

What You Need:
What You Do:
  1. Read through Printmaking 101 and Printmaking 102
  2. Talk about printmaking and how when you make a print, you can make several of the same image.
  3. Cut a piece of cereal box down to a nice size (about 6" x 8")
  4. Take several puzzle pieces and arrange them on the cereal box cardboard. The pieces can be arranged to create a picture, or they can just be laid down in a random pattern.
  5. Once you are happy with the way the pieces look, glue them down and let the glue dry for an hour or so.
  6. If you have a printmaking brayer, follow the directions below for printing with a brayer.
  7. If you don't have a printmaking brayer, use a paintbrush to cover the puzzle pieces with paint (or ink).

  8. Lay a sheet of paper on top of the painted puzzle pieces and rub gently with the palm of your hand.
  9. Remove the paper and sign the print and add the numbers 1/4
  10. Do 3 more prints so you have four all together. The second print should have the numbers 2/4; the third soul have the numbers 3/4 and the fourth should have the number 4/4 (of course you can do more than four, but then you have to number accordingly).

Basic Printmaking Supplies List:

Printing Using a Brayer (roller):

A Word About Paper:

There are so many different types of paper available from handmade to bond, the choices are endless. For printing lessons in a classroom setting, all you really need is white bond paper, manilla, newsprint or bristol board. If you have access to (and a budget for) special printmaking papers, you will notice a definite difference in the quality of printing. Rice, mulberry and watercolor papers all work extremely well with printmaking projects. Keep in mind however that with printmaking, you tend to go through a lot of paper. If you have papermaking facilities at your disposal, why not have your students make their own printmaking paper?

Recommended Books/Products:



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